PAX

Dotch Community Center
Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016
Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

To whom it may concern,

Did you know Spring Hill College has a Students for Life organization on campus? It is possible that you haven’t due to the organization’s inactive state. Students for Life is not exclusive to Spring Hill, it is a nationwide organization that is devoted and committed to raising awareness for the abolition of abortion. People from all around the country can relate to each other because of their support for this cause. Every campus’ Students for Life organization is unique, but they all have one thing in common; they are providing a voice for the voiceless.

Let me begin by saying that the intent of this letter is not to attack the pro-choice agenda or the supporters of that agenda. Rather, the goal is to appeal to young pro-life activists to not only be more active, but to become active in more creative and effective ways. The current inactive status of Students for Life is a problem that should be fixed for the good that can come out of this organization for the community.

Cigarette waste
Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

HELP SPREAD AWARENESS!

Fair Trade
Wednesday, January 13th, 2016
2016
Wednesday, January 13th, 2016
Infographic Patagonia
Wednesday, January 13th, 2016
Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

The following submission is in response to the following article: http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/i-cant-breathe-until-everyone-can-breathe and writing prompt: Like Gerald Mitchell, dig deep to identify and explain how you personally can treat people more justly. Describe what treating people fairly and humanely looks like to you. How might your actions make a difference where you live (school and community)? In greater society?

Every day in my life, I will meet a human who is not like me. We may be exactly alike, we may be different, we may be of the same ethnic background, and we may not. Yet, as I look into these people’s eyes, I see myself, and everyone I’ve ever met. We may be different on the outside, but we will always be the same on the inside. Nothing I will ever do will give me the right to hate them.

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

The following submission is in response to the following article: http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/i-cant-breathe-until-everyone-can-breathe and writing prompt: Like Gerald Mitchell, dig deep to identify and explain how you personally can treat people more justly. Describe what treating people fairly and humanely looks like to you. How might your actions make a difference where you live (school and community)? In greater society?

I am a black man. In today’s society as a black man you already start off with 2 strikes against you. Strike 1 is because you are black, which means that people automatically see you in a violent or negative stereotypical way. Strike 2 is because you are a man. Being a man, biologically we are already stereotyped to be more aggressive than women. So, I was always taught that I had to be twice as good and also learn how to be a chameleon who can blend in and articulate his thoughts to any and everybody in order to succeed in life. To be culturally diverse is key.

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

We are living in a place where the innocent are being dehumanized and slaughtered because of hatred. We are living in a place where the poor and the disabled are being taken advantage of because of their lack of resources. We are living in a place where people are opposed to helping others because of religion. We are living in a world where society wants to take but doesn't have the heart to give. We are living in a selfish world full of selfish people. We need a change.

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

The most important lesson I have learned this semester is that everything I encounter in my daily life can be studied with a social justice perspective. I have had the opportunity to expand my passion for social justice as a whole, which has changed my perspective on daily social interactions and my desire to do good in the world, one person at a time.

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

The following submission is in response to the following article: http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/i-cant-breathe-until-everyone-can-breathe and writing prompt: Like Gerald Mitchell, dig deep to identify and explain how you personally can treat people more justly. Describe what treating people fairly and humanely looks like to you. How might your actions make a difference where you live (school and community)? In greater society?

BY KARRIE QUIRIN

Every human- white or black, rich or poor- has a connection to another. When I began reading Gerald Mitchell’s article “I Can’t Breathe Until Everyone Can Breathe,” I already felt connected to him because he mentioned Ferguson. I am from a small town in Illinois about 45 minutes outside of Ferguson. And after the death of Eric Garner, I immediately saw the negative effects. Internally, I was enraged and wanted to take action. Far too many times I had heard the cases of police brutality against African Americans, often ending in death. But when I brought up the topic with a few of my black peers, I vividly remember receiving the response “How does this affect you?” Although I lived where they did, came from a similar social class as them, and even went to the same school, they thought the death of another human wouldn’t impact me because I wasn’t black.

 

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

Hello PAX Readers!

I hope everyone is off to a great semester, along with a great 2016. This past New Year, I had a multitude of wishes. I had so many wishes that it would be nearly impossible to list each and every one. However, above everything, my most important wish was for everyone in this world to find a little more peace. May we as a society stop feeding into and creating the bad news and negativity in this world and may we as individuals find more peace within ourselves during a time when anxiety, depression, and so much more plague so many of us.

PAX
Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

Hello PAX Readers!

Summer is finally in bloom and as the end of May approaches I know many of you (as am I) will be partaking in various Memorial Day celebrations and festivities. Personally, I do not believe that enough individuals in America understand the weight and significance of Memorial Day. I know that in the past, even I myself have often times let the day pass without giving it much thought. 

Monday, January 11th, 2016

     There are many different variables that come into play when you consider the relationship between the white man and the black man. Specifically, slavery has left a permanent social issue between the two groups. As social psychologists, we want to determine how we can fix or lessen the social gap between whites and blacks. To understand the root of the problem, we’d have to look back in the past at the struggles that the two groups have had. The movie Straight Outta Compton, would be a great film to watch and observe the struggles presented to the two groups.

Monday, January 11th, 2016

The following submission is in response to the following article: http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/i-cant-breathe-until-everyone-can-breathe and writing prompt: Like Gerald Mitchell, dig deep to identify and explain how you personally can treat people more justly. Describe what treating people fairly and humanely looks like to you. How might your actions make a difference where you live (school and community)? In greater society?

BY PAIGE GUILLORY

Albert Einstein said that “only a life lived in the service to others is worth living”2, and I prefer to say, only a life lived in complete awareness of the injustices that face others is worth living. Throughout my life, I have always made service an important part of my life because it allows me to experience people and parts of the world I would never be able to understand otherwise. I have always felt the call to service because I want to use my talents and the privileges I have as tools to help others who do not live as comfortably as I live. Through my service experiences, I have been made aware of many injustices that have continued to be problems from the past into today’s modern world, and I have been motivated to be passionate about social justice as well as service through my time at Spring Hill College. Because of the fundamental similarity in our humanness, I try to treat others with fairness by understanding as best I can each person’s unique background and life story because with awareness comes understanding. Awareness of injustices and bringing about social change takes courage, a deep understanding of humanity, and the willingness to be challenged, and I try to treat others fairly by becoming more aware daily of my surroundings and challenging others to become aware as well.

Monday, January 11th, 2016

The following submission is in response to the following article: http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/i-cant-breathe-until-everyone-ca... and writing prompt: Like Gerald Mitchell, dig deep to identify and explain how you personally can treat people more justly. Describe what treating people fairly and humanely looks like to you. How might your actions make a difference where you live (school and community)? In greater society?

BY JOHNATHAN BILLINGS

            In order to correctly determine how it is that we as both individuals and a society treat people more justly, it is important to operationally define justice.  I think that there’s more than one simple definition of what justice is or what it means to treat someone justly. There are, in a sense, dimensions of justice that need to be evaluated both internally and externally. The first dimension revolves around the idea that justice is an internal struggle that each and every individual in today’s society, driven by convenience, contemplates. We as humans have this desire for a belonging, and a tendency to do what is fair. Humans want things to remain in the natural balance of things. This eye for an eye concept however, needs to be dismissed. Unrealistic forces no longer drive us internally. We should feel morally obligated to help one another. Personally, it is difficult to treat others with a just mindset when we live in such an unjust society via structural influences. This is not to say that on an individual level we are not capable of being just to one another. This reflects the other dimension of what justice is. This dimension, the external one, is based off of actions that can be performed once the internal dimension has been solidified within our minds. I can choose to act however I feel to be just, but it must be based on morality. The common good, the general welfare of all other people should be the driving force in the actions we perform. Just actions and treatment of others can only result from the liberation of bias. This treatment could involve various actions, as long as they are driven by the primary factor, the genuine concern for the welfare of others.

Monday, January 11th, 2016

 

She scrubs and scrubs but can't seem to get rid of her filth,

Because no matter what, she will always live with the guilt.

No matter what, it will always be her fault.

But right is right & wrong is wrong, well at least that's what she thought.

 

Her family was concerned, but for only a few days,

Just enough time to switch up the blame.

"Shouldn't have drank so much, that's what you get"

"Why were you wearing those clothes, which were too promiscuous?"

 

Monday, January 11th, 2016

Clean the house

Cook the meals

Take care of the kids

Have a successful job

Overwhelming.

Do not overeat

Stay in shape

Look pretty

Act like lady

 

Is this what defines women?

I am strong

I am unique

I am smart

I am beautiful

Monday, January 11th, 2016

            High School is an important part in many adolescents’ lives. Stereotypes have been a large part of the high school experience as well as the amount of pressure that comes with the high school experience. These stereotypes and pressures that come along with high school inadvertently place labels on teens and can cause different psychological issues to arise. This film creates a different look at stereotypes and tries to break behind the mask of some of the most popular stereotypes and pressures in high school.

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