Aislinn Shevlin

Stories from Aislinn Shevlin

PAX
Tuesday, August 26th, 2014

Hello PAX Readers,

PAX
Tuesday, August 26th, 2014

Hello PAX Readers!

I hope you enjoy this issue as you prepare for Spring Break (even though it's still winter) and that you can engage with social justice issues on your vacations.  Whether you're on an Immersion trip abroad or catching beads at a Mardi Gras parade, you can make an impact just by increasing your own awareness of issues around you.  

PAX
Tuesday, August 26th, 2014

Winter Edition

Friday, January 31st, 2014

If you haven’t heard of Malala Yousafzai before, prepare to be amazed.  So far she’s become the youngest nominee for a Nobel Peace Prize and she’s won other humanitarian awards for her human rights activism and promotion of female education.  She’s taken on the Taliban and was shot in the face, almost fatally, for it. She’s addressed the United Nations and she’s now a published author.  Oh, did I mention she’s sixteen?

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

             It’s no secret that in the past fifty years, the women’s movement has made enormous strides.  Not only are women more prominent in number and status in the professional world, they outnumber boys in most colleges and universities across the country, so much so that some admissions offices work conscientiously to appeal to the male sex.  This would have seemed absurd in the 1950s when males were perceived as bread winners and the traditional life trajectory of a female focused on family and not career and education. 

            No longer are women dependent on men in order to live a prosperous life.  Another revolutionary change is the fact that women no longer require a male sexual partner in order to have kids.  Modern women can choose the adoption route or with new technologies and advancements, they can have a child essentially on their own.  These advancements may have been intended especially for homosexual women or women who can’t naturally conceive, but professional heterosexual women without husbands now have the option of fulfilling that gender role when they want and on their own terms.  This new crop of highly educated women is not only changing traditional perceptions of the feminine sex, they are transforming the economic and social spheres of gender and culture. 

Saturday, February 23rd, 2013

The tag line of the 2008 documentary film, Trouble the Water is “It’s not about a hurricane. It’s about America.” This is so fitting, because, while the film explores the circumstances surrounding Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Louisiana, it also tackles issues of race, class and the relationship between the American government and its citizens. In 2005, Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, but the problems arose during and after the storm, when the levees, which protect the below-sea level city from flooding, failed. The parts of the city that were most effected by the broken levees and in peril were the lower socioeconomic districts, specifically the Ninth Ward. While most of the city’s population evacuated, many citizens in the Ninth Ward couldn’t afford to leave and since there was no public transportation organized to evacuate the city, many stayed and were forced to gather in the attics of flooded homes until they were rescued. But many died in the process.