Anonymous

Stories from Anonymous

Martha's Place Mural
Wednesday, May 1st, 2013
Migration Installation
Wednesday, May 1st, 2013
Saturday, February 23rd, 2013

            The justice system in the United States is at work everyday in many situations. The justice system is charged with punishing and sentencing those who violate the laws set down by legislatures. These punishments rely on evidence of said crime that proves guilt. Sometimes however the justice system fails in its task. This can be seen in prisons and jails across the country where the innocent are punished for the failures of the system. Movies are often created to depict current events often with fictional twists to separate them from true situations. Double Jeopardy is such a movie. Double Jeopardy is the story of a woman tried and wrongly convicted for her husband’s death.

Saturday, February 23rd, 2013

            The justice system in the United States is at work everyday in many situations. The justice system is charged with punishing and sentencing those who violate the laws set down by legislatures. These punishments rely on evidence of said crime that proves guilt. Sometimes however the justice system fails in its task. This can be seen in prisons and jails across the country where the innocent are punished for the failures of the system. Movies are often created to depict current events often with fictional twists to separate them from true situations. Double Jeopardy is such a movie. Double Jeopardy is the story of a woman tried and wrongly convicted for her husband’s death.

Saturday, February 23rd, 2013

I’ve never thought of myself as poor. So naturally, I was very surprised when I called my mother to discuss what I had been researching for my PSY 385 class and I asked her how she would classify us in a socioeconomic category. “Borderline lower middle class, if not lower class” she said. I was puzzled. Hadn’t I always lived my life comfortably? I always had a roof over my head, we always had running water and cable TV, I went to an amazing public school in an upper middle class neighborhood. I knew what poor was. I grew up in an apartment complex, I’d seen ‘poor’ first hand, my dad couch surfed for a good portion of my life. I had to ask my mom why she would categorize us in such a manner. What brought us down to this status? Here, I have to admit that I thought less of myself than before, when the rest of my life I had spent thinking that I had a small leg up on society. I knew I wasn’t rich by any means, but not lower class. I’m ashamed to admit now that this disappointed me and after doing more research and hearing my mom explain things to me, I am much more open minded about this, and also thankful for the things I do have.

Saturday, February 23rd, 2013

Normally when I write a blog post, the inspiration behind it comes about in one of two ways. It is usually either an issue that I have always felt strongly about and just happened to want to write a blog post about (for example, the first blog post I ever wrote, which was about being pro-life and about disability rights), or something will happen to me that inspires me to sit down and write (Like my post about Mr. D, the homeless man who taught me how to dribble a basketball). The post I am going to be writing about today does not fall into either category. In fact, until recently, the issue I will be discussing today was something that rarely ever crossed my mind.

The issue I will be writing about is how I decided to become an ally for members of the Trans* community. It seems that so often when we hear about the LGBTQ community in the news, it is revolving around gay marriage or other issues of gay rights. There is rarely any talk about the Trans* (which signifies transgender male or female, bi-gender, genderqueer or anyone else who does not fit into the gender binary) community, Trans* rights or transphobia. Like I said before, I was not conscious of this until recently.

Saturday, February 23rd, 2013

Awareness brings us to share in the caring of one another.

Domestic abuse, more commonly referred to as domestic violence, involves a pattern of violence and emotional abuse in any relationship as a means to maintain power and control over an intimate partner.  Domestic violence can include physical, sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions or threats that harm or influence another person.

Saturday, February 23rd, 2013

Since the beginning of my college career at Spring Hill, I have been a part of the Foley Center work-study program. I have worked at elementary, middle, and high schools since my freshman year. These schools are located in the poor areas of Mobile and the students have very low socioeconomic status. On the American Psychological Association website, I found statistics comparing students of high socioeconomic status to those of low socioeconomic status. Studies from 2002 and 2008 showed that students from low socioeconomic status were more likely to struggle with language and math skills and were more likely to struggle with reading.